1988 – Church at The Mill was born

Retired pastor Floyd Loudermilk and his wife, Sara were approached by the Spartanburg Baptist Association with a proposal to start a mission on the west side of Spartanburg. In February of 1988, Floyd and Sara held a meeting in their living room, and the church was born.

1998 – Possess The Land

With the rise in membership and visitors, it was necessary to review the church’s capacity to minister to a growing population. After deciding to build a facility the church officially purchased the piece of land that was always the most ideal location on Anderson Mill Road.

2004 – The Right Man

In 2004 after almost two years without a pastor, The Lord brought our current shepherd, Dr. D.J. Horton to Church at The Mill.  He was 25 and just finishing his first seminary degree when he and his wife Laurel moved to Spartanburg with their three-week-old firstborn child.  Since then D.J.’s family and our church have witnessed incredible growth.

2004 – The Time is Now

For years it had been predicted that Church at The Mill was poised to experience breakout growth.  The leadership and congregation decided to stop saying it could happen.  They declared, “the time is now.”  After a three year spiritual and financial journey, the church finally moved into a new facility in March of 2009 that would allow Church at The Mill to begin the journey of becoming a regional church drawing people from all over the Upstate of South Carolina.

2016 – GREATER

After worshiping across five overflowing services in two buildings each Sunday, it was a rare day when the entire congregation came together in one place to worship. On October 30th, 2016, the body gathered at the Upward Star Center for Commitment Sunday to kick-off the “GREATER” capital campaign to build a new 2,000+-seat facility.  GREATER had very little to do with adding another building to the campus or creating an impression of size and prominence.  Pastor D.J. continued to remind the church that this journey was not about building a greater church building. It was about building for a greater church.